Tough Enough to Tango by Barbara Barrett

A slightly cheesy title and cover photo considering there is no dancing present in this contemporary romance, but I don’t care. I love it anyway.

What’s it About? 

tough

When her father’s heart problems temporarily put him on the sidelines, Shae Harriman steps in to run his general contracting company and oversee the largest residential building project the company has ever tackled, Sullivan’s Creek. Though she has the education, she has no management or supervisory experience, which immediately alienates her crews. Megastar entertainer Ned Collier undertook Sullivan’s Creek to get his mother into safer housing while he is on the road, but now he’s running out of money, and his ego doesn’t want her, his best friend or anyone else to know. To Shae’s consternation, he insists on serving as his own project manager so he can control costs. Their inexperience pitted against her desire to succeed, his autonomous penny-pinching maneuvers, and high stakes construction issues send them into each other’s arms, even though they come from two different worlds.    

First Impressions

There is a constant power struggle at play throughout this entire novel, which translates into some oh so yummy sexual tension. Due to Ned’s inability to put on concerts because of his throat issues, he’s having some rather dire financial issues, and wants more say in the construction project he’s funding in his home town to ensure that  things stay under budget. At the same time, Shae is trying to prove her worth as a general contractor to her father, and isn’t willing to give up control to anyone. Ned and Shae butt heads, and it’s only a matter of time before someone ends up on top. At the construction site it’s her, but in the bedroom it’s all him. See what I did there?

Blowing the Lid Off with all this Steaminess

Good God, the sexual tension. You know it’s inevitable that they’ll eventually give in to their temptations, and blow off some steam in the bedroom. It’s just a question of when, and I must say the author does a fantastic job of drawing out the seduction. Every time you think, “This is it! They’re finally gonna do it!”, she manages to prolong the suspense just a little bit more.

almost

Once they finally did the deed there was so much steam it was making my hair frizzy. One of my absolutely favorite scenes, and arguably the best of the book was when they made love to one of Ned’s musical compositions. Oh…my…glockenspiel. They start off thrusting up against a wall, and then somehow end up on the floor. Don’t even get me started on the convenience of making love in a sound proof music studio! I feel like this book should be sold with an iTunes accompaniment which you can listen to during that scene.

More Pride Than Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcypride

Both Ned and Shae try their hardest to prove their worth, and are determined to do it all on their own without asking for help. But as problems constantly arise they eventually realize they can’t move forward without support from others. Once they start working together instead of against each other they grow as individuals and as a couple. It’s just so freakin’ sweet I can’t help myself.

*A copy of this book was provided for an honest review*

Series: Sullivan’s Creek, book 1. I really hope there is a sequel featuring Ned’s best friend Mike. He’s so funny, but I have a feeling he’d also be a really strong character. And lover. Oh my.

Should you read it? Cheesy title aside, it’s actually a really good read. The characters were so dynamic, and it was fun uncovering why they both put up such an imposing front. Keep in mind though that they do hate each other at first, before they give in to their desires.

Smut Level: Hot as hell! I also loved that during their first sexual encounter Shae took the reins simply because she had to know how it felt.

Get it on Amazon: Click Here. $5.99 Kindle Price. The Wild Rose Press, Inc. 272 Pages.

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