Gage by Tess Oliver

A down-on-her-luck singer who decides to make a go of running her grandfather’s Montana restaurant, even though she has no experience in the food industry. Somewhere in the world Gordon Ramsay is having a panic attack.

What’s it About?

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After nearly losing his friend in a logging accident, Gage Barringer is convinced now more than ever that he needs to find a different job. But his side business of breaking colts at the small Montana ranch he inherited from his grandfather doesn’t earn him enough money. He has his mind set on running The Raven’s Nest, a popular bar and restaurant near his ranch. The original owner has died and Gage is waiting for it to be put up for sale. But there is a five-foot-four, brown eyed, obstacle in his way, an obstacle with lips made for sin and a voice made for breaking hearts. And Summer Donovan is one road block Gage Barringer won’t be able to find a way around.

First Impressions

A small ranch town in Montana. A local logger with muscles and swagger. A young city-woman attempting to start life anew. A restaurant caught between them as a source for animosity even as they battle their growing attraction for each other? Count…me…in! Just one teeny tiny little problem here though. The synopsis description about Gage being convinced he needs to get out of the logging business, and that he’ll seemingly do anything to gain control of the restaurant that could prove to be his ticket out of a life-threatening job? Pretty misleading. Gage’s interest in the Raven’s Nest seemingly lasts for about 5 minutes as a passing fancy; one which he quickly abandons as soon as Summer comes to town.

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I was kind of looking forward to this restaurant business being a source of tension between the two, especially seeing as it implies that Gage was desperate to remove himself from such a dangerous job as a logger. In the end, we see that Gage really doesn’t put up a fight at all to claim the restaurant, and even turns down an offer from Summer to become part owner of the place. Really makes you wonder if he had gone through with purchasing the Raven’s Nest at the start of the novel how long his interest would have remained. Overall the lust-filled flirtations between Gage and Summer were certainly entertaining, but the story could have benefited from an added layer of depth if this claim to the restaurant had remained as a source of tension throughout more of the plot.

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Breaking in a Wild Stallion

Summer and Gage may have had a rough introduction to each other at the start of the novel, but it doesn’t take long before their open flirtations turn into something more. An interesting dilemma that they both face though is a hesitancy to voice how much they actually care about the other, as both are afraid the other might flee. In regards to Summer’s possible flight, it’s a bit of a more obvious source for concern. Gage fears that this city girl he’s come to care for won’t be able to handle the difficult travails of a Montana winter, not to mention the complications of running her grandfather’s restaurant which has become a staple of this small mountain town. With the lure of a possible recording contract waiting for her back in California, Gage believes it’s just a matter of time before Summer runs back to California before he’s even had a chance to win her heart.

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As for Gage, this small town is his home. It always has been, and always will be, so there’s no potential risk of him fleeing in terms of physical distance. However, Summer worries that based on his many past dalliances with other women she won’t be able to maintain his interest for long. She can admit to herself that she’s falling hard for this man, but she’s worried he might walk away from her just as she’s starting to lose her heart to him. How could a bachelor so seemingly set in his non-commitment lifestyle change everything for her? Both Gage and Summer are worried to put their true feelings on the line, as they assume it won’t be long before the other loses interest and turns a blind eye on their newfound relationship

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Cut Out the Drama

Summer has come to this small Montana town in an attempt to leave behind all the drama from her life in L.A. On the cusp of receiving a major record contract, she was devastated to learn that the record company was only interested in signing her rather than the other members of her band. On top of it, a certain media mogul was more interested in getting in her panties than promoting her vocal abilities. As if that weren’t bad enough, she discovered that her boyfriend (and band-mate) was cheating on her with her supposed best friend. Summer was desperate to get away from it all, including her overbearing mother who was only interested in the potential profits her daughter’s burgeoning music career could bring her.

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When Summer arrives in Montana, she’s desperate to ignore all of the negative forces that are trying to impede on her newfound happiness. You have to admire the fact she’s leaving behind all she knew to break out on her own, as well as cut out the drama of all the people who tried to use her for their own selfish personal gains. The only minor problem with this though is that it left most of the book a bit lacking in drama and excitement, since she was essentially choosing to ignore it all. Summer was determined to not answer any imposing phone calls from her mother, her agent, her ex-boyfriend, and even her mother’s lawyer. Sure, this does eventually come to a boiling point at the very end of the novel, but for the bulk of it we mainly focus on Summer and Gage getting close in the physical sense. A bit more incorporation throughout of Summer’s familial issues back in California, as well as Gage’s supposed dislike of his logging job would have helped lend a bit of struggle to the story.

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Series: The Barringer Brothers, book 1. Technically this is the first book in this series, but it does reference some people and events from the Rainshadow series involving Gage’s brother. You can definitely get by without having read it, as the events from that novel don’t really play into the overall plot of this one. However, just be forewarned that a few times here and there it was tricky to know what people/events the characters were referencing.

Final Impression: An ok read for the beach, or a mountain cabin escape. Summer’s determination to make her life in Montana a success no matter what was both admirable, yet also ignorant at times. Although I agree that Summer’s mother was a sad excuse for a parental figure, I do wish we’d had a bit more insight into their relationship, and maybe one or two additional scenes of them directly confronting each other. As for Gage, he’s definitely passionate about Summer, but we needed to see more passion in regards to what he was doing with his life. He’s clearly not interested in being a logger long-term, even though he’s still involved with it at the end of the novel, and we get just a brief glimpse of his interest in breaking in horses at his ranch. More focus on his endeavors there would have given us more of an idea of what this mountain man truly cares about in life.

Smut Level: Gage isn’t aware of his own brute strength apparently. At the start of the novel he’s getting down and dirty with a woman in the bathroom of Summer’s restaurant, and the two of them manage to break the sink from the wall.

Get it on Amazon: Click Here. $0.99 Kindle Price. Sugartree Press. 284 Pages.

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